Benjamin-Nicolau 's

Environm Ciencia, Tecnologia y Economia

Archive for 27/06/08

Taxation trends in the EU, tax ratio at 39,9% of GPD

Posted by benjamin-nicolau en junio 27, 2008

Taxation trends in the EU
EU27 tax ratio at 39.9% of GDP in 2006
Strongest year-on-year increase in ten years

The weighted tax-to-GDP ratio(i.e. the total amount of taxes and social security contributions) in the EU272 increased to 39.9% in 2006 from 39.3% in 2005. The EU27 tax ratio is nevertheless lower than in 1996 (40.3%) and the peak of 41.0% in 1999. The downtrend which had started in 1999 in most Member States stopped in 2005. In 2006, the overall tax ratio in the euro area2 (EA15) was 40.5%, up from 39.8% in 2005. Since 1996, taxes in the euro area have followed a similar trend to the EU27, although at a slightly higher level.

EU tax levels remain generally high in comparison with the rest of the world, with the EU27 tax ratio exceeding those of the USA andJapan by some 12 percentage points. However, the tax burden varies significantly between Member States, ranging in 2006 from less than 30% in Romania (28.6%), Slovakia (29.3%) and Lithuania (29.7%), to almost 50% in Denmark (49.1%) and Sweden(48.9%).

In the past decade significant changes in tax-to-GDP ratios have taken place in several Member States. The largest falls were recorded inSlovakia, where the overall tax burden dropped from 39.4% in 1996 to 29.3% in 2006, and Estonia (from 35.1% to 31.0%). The highest increases were observed in Cyprus (from 26.4% to 36.6%) and Malta (from 25.4% to 33.8%).

Labour taxes remain the largest source of tax revenue, representing close to half of total tax receipts in the EU27. Taxes on capital accounted for approximately 23% of total tax receipts, and consumption taxes 28%.

This information comes from the publication Taxation trends in the European Union: Data for the EU Member States and Norway3 issued by Eurostat, the Statistical Office of the European Communities and the Commission’s Directorate-General for Taxation and Customs Union. This publication compiles tax indicators in a harmonised framework based on the European System of Accounts (ESA 95), allowing accurate comparison of the tax systems and tax policies between EU Member States.

Tax burden has increased more on capital than on labour and consumption

For the EU27 as a whole, the average implicit tax rate (ITR) on labour(including social contributions), the preferred indicator for the average tax burden, amounted to 34.8% in 2006, compared with 34.6% in 2005. The decline registered since 2000 stopped in 2005, despite a wide consensus on the desirability of reducing labour taxes. However, the tax burden is still lower than its maximum of 36.2% in 2000. Among the Member States, in 2006 this rate ranged from 21.5% in Malta, 24.2% in Cyprus, 25.1% in Ireland and 25.5% in the United Kingdom, to 44.5% in Sweden, 43.0% in Italy, 42.8% in Belgium and 42.1% in France. Despite the presence of a number of low taxing countries, taxation on labour is, on average, much higher in the EU than in the other main industrialised economies.

In line with the development over the last few years, the average implicit tax rate on consumption4 in the EU27 increased again in 2006, though only marginally, from 22.0% to 22.1%. Consumption was most taxed in Denmark (34.0%), Sweden (28.1%) andFinland (27.3%), while the lowest implicit rates were registered in Spain (16.4%), Lithuania (16.7%) and Italy (17.2%).

The average implicit tax rate on capital4 in the EU27 rose sharply from 26.8% in 2005 to 29.0% in 2006, which could be mainly attributed to business cycle effects. There is considerable disparity in this ratio: among the Member States for which 2006 data are available, the highest implicit tax rates on capital were recorded in Ireland (42.5%), France (41.5%) and Denmark (40.9%), and the lowest in Estonia (8.4%) and Lithuania (14.1%). Latvia registered 9.6% in 2005.

Tax revenue and implicit tax rates* by type of economic activity

Tax revenue,
% of GDP
Implicit tax rate on:
Consumption
Labour
Capital
1996
2005
2006
1996
2005
2006
1996
2005
2006
1996
2005
2006
EU27**
40.3
39.3
39.9
21.1
22.0
22.1
35.7
34.6
34.8
24.6
26.8
29.0
EA15**
40.7
39.8
40.5
19.9
21.4
21.6
34.1
34.4
34.7
25.4
30.0
31.7
BE
44.4
44.9
44.6
21.3
22.2
22.4
43.4
43.9
42.8
26.7
32.1
32.3
BG
:
34.1
34.4
:
24.4
25.9
:
34.7
30.9
:
:
:
CZ
34.7
37.1
36.2
21.2
22.2
21.2
39.5
41.7
41.0
22.3
25.5
24.9
DK
49.2
50.7
49.1
31.6
33.6
34.0
40.2
37.5
37.0
30.9
47.7
40.9
DE
40.7
38.7
39.3
18.3
18.0
18.2
39.6
38.6
39.6
25.6
22.9
23.4
EE
35.1
30.6
31.0
19.1
22.8
23.6
39.1
34.1
33.9
16.0
7.9
8.4
IE
33.1
30.8
32.6
24.7
26.5
26.9
29.3
25.1
25.1
27.1
37.5
42.5
EL
29.4
31.3
31.4
17.7
17.0
17.6
35.7
37.8
38.1
11.6
:
:
ES
33.1
35.6
36.5
14.4
16.3
16.4
29.5
30.6
31.6
20.6
36.0
38.7
FR
43.9
43.8
44.2
22.1
20.1
20.0
41.5
41.7
42.1
34.7
40.0
41.5
IT
41.8
40.6
42.3
17.1
16.8
17.2
41.5
42.8
43.0
28.2
30.4
34.4
CY
26.4
35.5
36.6
12.3
20.0
20.4
22.3
24.5
24.2
:
31.0
36.6
LV
30.8
29.0
30.1
17.9
20.2
20.0
34.6
33.2
33.5
15.7
9.6
:
LT
27.9
28.8
29.7
16.4
16.5
16.7
35.0
34.9
34.1
15.4
11.5
14.1
LU
37.6
37.8
35.6
20.8
25.5
25.1
29.6
30.0
29.6
:
:
:
HU
40.6
37.4
37.2
29.5
26.4
25.8
43.1
37.8
39.0
:
:
:
MT
25.4
33.7
33.8
14.0
19.1
19.8
17.8
21.9
21.5
:
:
:
NL
40.2
37.9
39.5
23.3
25.3
26.9
33.3
30.5
33.5
23.2
20.7
20.0
AT
42.6
42.0
41.8
20.7
21.2
20.9
39.5
41.0
41.2
28.0
23.2
23.4
PL
37.2
32.8
33.8
21.2
19.6
20.2
36.3
33.1
34.4
21.3
22.2
:
PT
32.8
35.1
35.9
19.5
20.6
21.1
26.5
28.4
28.5
23.0
28.1
:
RO
:
27.9
28.6
:
18.0
17.7
:
29.1
:
:
:
:
SI
39.1
39.3
39.1
24.7
24.2
24.2
37.1
37.5
37.6
:
:
:
SK
39.4
31.5
29.3
24.2
22.2
20.2
39.4
32.9
30.3
33.3
19.1
18.1
FI
47.0
44.0
43.5
27.4
27.6
27.3
45.3
41.5
41.5
30.9
27.5
24.6
SE
50.3
49.5
48.9
27.2
28.1
28.1
48.0
44.7
44.5
26.6
:
:
UK
35.0
36.6
37.4
19.9
18.7
18.5
24.8
25.3
25.5
31.8
36.8
39.7
NO
42.4
43.5
44.0
31.0
29.7
31.1
38.2
38.5
38.0
:
:
:

Source: European Commission Services.

* Implicit tax rates (ITR) measure the effective average tax burden on different types of economic income or activities, i.e. on labour, consumption and capital. ITR express aggregate tax revenues as a percentage of the potential tax base for each field (see footnote 4).

** EU27 and EA15 overall tax ratios are computed on the basis of a GDP-weighted average. For all other indicators the aggregates are calculated as arithmetic averages of the Member States for which the respective annual data are available.

: Data not available

Environmental tax revenues declined to lowest level in a decade

Despite intense public interest in environmental issues, environmental tax revenues in the EU27 have been declining since 1999; their 2006 level, 2.6% of GDP, is the lowest in a decade. This drop is due to lower energy taxation, as revenues from the other environmental taxes have remained broadly stable.

Environmental tax revenue, % of GDP

1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
Environmental taxes
EU27*
2.8
2.8
2.8
2.9
2.8
2.7
2.7
2.7
2.7
2.6
2.6
EA15*
2.7
2.7
2.7
2.8
2.6
2.6
2.6
2.7
2.6
2.6
2.5
Energy taxes
EU27*
2.1
2.1
2.1
2.2
2.1
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
1.9
1.9
EA15*
2.1
2.1
2.0
2.1
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
1.9
1.9
1.8

* GDP-weighted averages.

 

Top personal and corporate income tax rates on average lower in the new Member States

The top personal income tax rate differs substantially within the EU. The highest top rates5 on 2007 personal income were found inDenmark (59.0%), Sweden (56.6%), the Netherlands (52.0%) and Finland (50.5%), and the lowest in Romania (16.0%),Slovakia (19.0%), Estonia (22.0%) and Bulgaria (24.0%).

For corporate income tax, the highest adjusted top statutory tax rates6 on 2008 income were recorded in Malta (35.0%), France(34.4%), Belgium (34.0%) and Italy (31.4%), and the lowest in Bulgaria and Cyprus (both 10.0%), Ireland (12.5%), Latvia andLithuania (both 15.0%).

Over recent years, top rates have shown a clear downward trend in the whole of the EU, particularly in the corporate area. In 2008,Germany (-8.9 percentage points), Italy (-5.9), the Czech Republic (-3.0), and Lithuania (-3.0) decreased their top rates most significantly. On average, the new Member States display markedly lower top rates.

Top statutory personal income tax rate on 2007 income, %

RO
SK
EE
BG
LV
LT
CY
CZ
MT
EU27*
LU
HU
EL
FR
PL
16.0
19.0
22.0
24.0
25.0
27.0
30.0
32.0
35.0
38.7
39.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

 

UK
EA15*
IE
SI
PT
IT
ES
DE
BE
AT
FI
NL
SE
DK
40.0
40.2
41.0
41.0
42.0
43.0
43.0
47.5
50.0
50.0
50.5
52.0
56.6
59.0

Source: European Commission Services.

* Arithmetic average.

Adjusted top statutory tax rate* on corporate income in 2008, %

BG
CY
IE
LV
LT
RO
PL
SK
EE
CZ
HU
SI
EU27**
EL
AT
10.0
10.0
12.5
15.0
15.0
16.0
19.0
19.0
21.0
21.0
21.3
22.0
23.6
25.0
25.0

 

DK
NL
FI
PT
EA15**
SE
LU
DE
UK
ES
IT
BE
FR
MT
25.0
25.5
26.0
26.5
26.5
28.0
29.6
29.8
30.0
30.0
31.4
34.0
34.4
35.0

Source: European Commission Services.

* Adjusted top statutory tax rate on corporate income takes into account corporate income tax (CIT) and, if they exist, surcharges, local taxes, or even additional taxes levied on tax bases that are similar but often not identical to the CIT. In order to take these features into account, the simple CIT rate has been adjusted for comparison purposes.

** Arithmetic average.

  1. The tax-to-GDP ratio measures the overall tax burden as the total amount of taxes and compulsory actual social security contributions as a percentage of GDP. This indicator is widely used to measure the overall tax burden but includes the taxes that are raised on social transfers. Because social transfer recipients often receive directly a net payment they do not feel the burden of paying taxes. This definition differs slightly from the one used in the Statistics in Focus, Economy and Finance, 47/2008, “Tax revenue in the EU”, which includes the voluntary and imputed social contributions. The difference between the two measures amounts to around 1½% of GDP for the EU and euro area aggregates.
  2. EU27: Belgium (BE), Bulgaria (BG), the Czech Republic (CZ), Denmark (DK), Germany (DE), Estonia (EE), Ireland (IE), Greece (EL), Spain (ES), France (FR), Italy (IT), Cyprus (CY), Latvia (LV), Lithuania (LT), Luxembourg (LU), Hungary (HU), Malta (MT), the Netherlands (NL), Austria (AT), Poland (PL), Portugal (PT), Romania (RO), Slovenia (SI), Slovakia (SK), Finland (FI), Sweden (SE) and the United Kingdom (UK). Euro area (EA15): Belgium, Germany, Ireland, Greece, Spain, France, Italy, Cyprus, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Austria, Portugal, Slovenia and Finland.
  3. Taxation trends in the European Union: 1995-2006“, EUR 40 (excl. VAT), only available in English. This publication is based on data available on 19 February 2008. It can be purchased from authorised sales agents or downloaded free of charge in PDF format from the Eurostat or the DG TAXUD website: 
  4. Implicit tax rates (ITR) measure the effective average tax burden on different types of economic income or activities, i.e. on labour, consumption and capital. ITR express aggregate tax revenues as a percentage of the potential tax base for each field.

The ITR on labour is the ratio between taxes and social contributions paid on earned income and the cost of labour. The numerator includes all direct and indirect taxes and employees’ and employers’ social contributions levied on employed labour income, while the denominator amounts to the total compensation of employees working in the economic territory increased by taxes on wage bill and payroll. It is calculated for employed labour only (so excluding the tax burden falling on social transfers, including pensions). The average may conceal important variations in the tax burden across the income distribution.

The ITR on consumption is the ratio between the revenue from consumption taxes and the final consumption expenditure of households on the economic territory.

The ITR on capital includes, in the numerator, the taxes levied on the income earned from savings and investments by households and corporations and taxes related to stocks of capital stemming from savings and investment in previous periods. The denominator of the capital ITR is a proxy of the world-wide capital and business income of Member States’ residents for domestic tax purposes. Trends in the capital ITR reflect a wide range of factors and it should be interpreted with caution.

All ITRs for the EU and the euro area are calculated as arithmetic averages.

  1. The top statutory personal income tax rate reflects the tax rate for the highest income bracket. For Denmark, Finland and Sweden the municipal income tax is also included. German data include the solidarity surcharge. The Hungarian rate includes the solidarity tax.
  2. The adjusted top statutory tax rate on corporate income takes into account corporate income tax (CIT) and, if they exist, surcharges, local taxes, or even additional taxes levied on tax bases that are similar but often not identical to the CIT. In order to take these features into account, the simple CIT rate has been adjusted for comparison purposes.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

evolucion de la fiscalidad en la union europea, la carga fiscal representa el 39,9 % del PIB

Posted by benjamin-nicolau en junio 27, 2008

 

Évolution de la fiscalité dans l’UE
La charge fiscale a représenté 39,9% du PIB dans l’UE27 en 2006
La plus forte hausse annuelle en dix ans

En 2006, la charge fiscale1 (soit le montant total des impôts et cotisations sociales) représentait dans l’UE272 39,9% du PIB, contre 39,3% en 2005. Ce pourcentage est néanmoins inférieur au chiffre de 1996 (40,3%) et au pic de 41,0% atteint en 1999. La tendance à la baisse, qui avait commencé en 1999 dans la plupart des États membres, s’est interrompue en 2005. Dans la zone euro2 (ZE15), la charge fiscale globale a atteint 40,5% en 2006, contre 39,8% en 2005. Depuis 1996, la fiscalité dans la zone euro a connu une évolution similaire à celle de l’UE27, quoiqu’à un niveau légèrement supérieur.

Les niveaux d’imposition dans l’UE demeurent généralement élevés par rapport au reste du monde, celui de l’UE27 dépassant ceux desÉtats-Unis et du Japon de quelques 12 points de pourcentage. La charge fiscale varie néanmoins de façon significative d’un État membre à l’autre, allant, en 2006, de moins de 30% en Roumanie (28,6%), Slovaquie (29,3%) et Lituanie (29,7%) à presque 50% au Danemark (49,1%) et en Suède (48,9%).

Les taux d’imposition de plusieurs États membres ont varié de manière importante au cours de la dernière décennie. Les plus fortes baisses ont été enregistrées en Slovaquie, où la charge fiscale globale a diminué de 39,4% en 1996 à 29,3% en 2006, et en Estonie(de 35,1% à 31,0%). Les hausses les plus importantes ont été observées à Chypre (de 26,4% à 36,6%) et à Malte (de 25,4% à 33,8%).

L’imposition du travail demeure la principale source de recettes fiscales, représentant près de la moitié du total des recettes dans l’UE27. L’imposition du capital représentait environ 23% du total des recettes et les taxes sur la consommation 28%.

Ces informations sont extraites de la publication «Taxation trends in the European Union: Data for the EU Member States and Norway»3 publiée par Eurostat, l’Office statistique des Communautés européennes et la Direction générale Fiscalité et Union douanière de la Commission. Cette publication présente un ensemble d’indicateurs fiscaux harmonisés et basés sur le système européen des comptes (SEC 95), permettant une comparaison fiable des systèmes fiscaux et des politiques fiscales entre les États membres de l’UE.

La charge fiscale a plus augmenté sur le capital que sur le travail et la consommation

Dans l’UE27 dans son ensemble, le taux d’imposition implicite du travail4 (incluant les cotisations sociales), l’indicateur qui a la préférence quand il s’agit d’observer la pression fiscale moyenne, s’élevait à 34,8% en 2006, contre 34,6% en 2005. La baisse enregistrée depuis 2000 s’est interrompue en 2005, malgré un large consensus sur l’opportunité d’une diminution de l’imposition du travail. La charge fiscale reste toutefois en-deçà de son niveau maximum de 36,2% atteint en 2000. Parmi les États membres, ce taux variait en 2006 de 21,5% à Malte, 24,2% à Chypre, 25,1% en Irlande et 25,5% au Royaume-Uni à 44,5% en Suède, 43,0% enItalie, 42,8% en Belgique et 42,1% en France. Malgré la présence d’un certain nombre de pays à faible fiscalité, l’imposition du travail est, en moyenne, plus élevée dans l’UE que dans les autres principales économies industrialisées.

En ligne avec l’évolution observée au cours des dernières années, le taux d’imposition implicite sur la consommation4 a de nouveau augmenté, quoique marginalement, dans l’UE27 en 2006, passant de 22,0% en 2005 à 22,1% en 2006. La consommation a été la plus imposée au Danemark (34,0%), en Suède (28,1%) et en Finlande (27,3%), tandis que les taux d’imposition implicites les plus faibles ont été enregistrés en Espagne (16,4%), en Lituanie (16,7%) et en Italie (17,2%).

Le taux d’imposition implicite moyen du capital4 a fortement augmenté dans l’UE27, passant de 26,8% en 2005 à 29,0% en 2006, en raison principalement des effets du cycle économique. Ce taux présente de fortes variations: parmi les États membres pour lesquels les données de 2006 sont disponibles, les taux d’imposition implicites du capital les plus élevés ont été enregistrés en Irlande (42,5%), enFrance (41,5%) et au Danemark (40,9%), et les plus faibles en Estonie (8,4%) et en Lituanie (14,1%). La Lettonie a enregistré un taux de 9,6% en 2005.

Recettes fiscales et taux d’imposition implicites* par type d’activité économique

 

 
Recettes fiscales
en % du PIB
Taux d’imposition implicite sur:
la consommation
le travail
le capital
1996
2005
2006
1996
2005
2006
1996
2005
2006
1996
2005
2006
UE27**
40,3
39,3
39,9
21,1
22,0
22,1
35,7
34,6
34,8
24,6
26,8
29,0
ZE15**
40,7
39,8
40,5
19,9
21,4
21,6
34,1
34,4
34,7
25,4
30,0
31,7
BE
44,4
44,9
44,6
21,3
22,2
22,4
43,4
43,9
42,8
26,7
32,1
32,3
BG
:
34,1
34,4
:
24,4
25,9
:
34,7
30,9
:
:
:
CZ
34,7
37,1
36,2
21,2
22,2
21,2
39,5
41,7
41,0
22,3
25,5
24,9
DK
49,2
50,7
49,1
31,6
33,6
34,0
40,2
37,5
37,0
30,9
47,7
40,9
DE
40,7
38,7
39,3
18,3
18,0
18,2
39,6
38,6
39,6
25,6
22,9
23,4
EE
35,1
30,6
31,0
19,1
22,8
23,6
39,1
34,1
33,9
16,0
7,9
8,4
IE
33,1
30,8
32,6
24,7
26,5
26,9
29,3
25,1
25,1
27,1
37,5
42,5
EL
29,4
31,3
31,4
17,7
17,0
17,6
35,7
37,8
38,1
11,6
:
:
ES
33,1
35,6
36,5
14,4
16,3
16,4
29,5
30,6
31,6
20,6
36,0
38,7
FR
43,9
43,8
44,2
22,1
20,1
20,0
41,5
41,7
42,1
34,7
40,0
41,5
IT
41,8
40,6
42,3
17,1
16,8
17,2
41,5
42,8
43,0
28,2
30,4
34,4
CY
26,4
35,5
36,6
12,3
20,0
20,4
22,3
24,5
24,2
:
31,0
36,6
LV
30,8
29,0
30,1
17,9
20,2
20,0
34,6
33,2
33,5
15,7
9,6
:
LT
27,9
28,8
29,7
16,4
16,5
16,7
35,0
34,9
34,1
15,4
11,5
14,1
LU
37,6
37,8
35,6
20,8
25,5
25,1
29,6
30,0
29,6
:
:
:
HU
40,6
37,4
37,2
29,5
26,4
25,8
43,1
37,8
39,0
:
:
:
MT
25,4
33,7
33,8
14,0
19,1
19,8
17,8
21,9
21,5
:
:
:
NL
40,2
37,9
39,5
23,3
25,3
26,9
33,3
30,5
33,5
23,2
20,7
20,0
AT
42,6
42,0
41,8
20,7
21,2
20,9
39,5
41,0
41,2
28,0
23,2
23,4
PL
37,2
32,8
33,8
21,2
19,6
20,2
36,3
33,1
34,4
21,3
22,2
:
PT
32,8
35,1
35,9
19,5
20,6
21,1
26,5
28,4
28,5
23,0
28,1
:
RO
:
27,9
28,6
:
18,0
17,7
:
29,1
:
:
:
:
SI
39,1
39,3
39,1
24,7
24,2
24,2
37,1
37,5
37,6
:
:
:
SK
39,4
31,5
29,3
24,2
22,2
20,2
39,4
32,9
30,3
33,3
19,1
18,1
FI
47,0
44,0
43,5
27,4
27,6
27,3
45,3
41,5
41,5
30,9
27,5
24,6
SE
50,3
49,5
48,9
27,2
28,1
28,1
48,0
44,7
44,5
26,6
:
:
UK
35,0
36,6
37,4
19,9
18,7
18,5
24,8
25,3
25,5
31,8
36,8
39,7
NO
42,4
43,5
44,0
31,0
29,7
31,1
38,2
38,5
38,0
:
:
:

Sources: Services de la Commission européenne.

* Les taux d’imposition implicites (TII) mesurent la charge fiscale moyenne réelle sur les différents types de revenus ou d’activités économiques, c’est-à-dire sur le travail salarié, sur la consommation et sur le capital. Les TII expriment des revenus fiscaux cumulés, en pourcentage de la base d’imposition pour chaque domaine (voir note de bas de page 4).

** Les taux d’imposition globaux de l’UE27 et de la ZE15 sont calculés sur la base d’une moyenne pondérée par le PIB. Pour tous les autres indicateurs, les agrégats sont calculés en tant que moyenne arithmétique des États membres pour lesquels les données annuelles correspondantes sont disponibles.

: Données non disponibles

Les recettes des taxes environnementales ont atteint leur plus bas niveau en dix ans

En dépit du grand intérêt public que suscitent les questions environnementales, les recettes des taxes environnementales ont connu une baisse depuis 1999, le taux de 2,6% du PIB en 2006 restant le plus faible sur les dix dernières années. Cette diminution est due à un niveau plus faible d’imposition de l’énergie, les recettes provenant des autres taxes environnementales étant restées stables.

Recettes des taxes environnementales en % du PIB

 

 
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
Taxes environnementales
UE27*
2,8
2,8
2,8
2,9
2,8
2,7
2,7
2,7
2,7
2,6
2,6
ZE15*
2,7
2,7
2,7
2,8
2,6
2,6
2,6
2,7
2,6
2,6
2,5
Taxes sur l’énergie
UE27*
2,1
2,1
2,1
2,2
2,1
2,0
2,0
2,0
2,0
1,9
1,9
ZE15*
2,1
2,1
2,0
2,1
2,0
2,0
2,0
2,0
1,9
1,9
1,8

* Moyennes pondérées par le PIB.

Les taux maximums de l’impôt sur le revenu des personnes et de l’impôt sur le revenu des sociétés sont plus faibles, en moyenne, dans les nouveaux États membres.

Le taux d’imposition maximum sur le revenu des personnes présente de grandes variations à l’intérieur de l’UE. En 2007, les taux d’imposition maximums5 sur le revenu des personnes étaient les plus élevés au Danemark (59,0%), en Suède (56,6%), aux Pays-Bas (52,0%) et en Finlande (50,5%), et les plus faibles en Roumanie (16,0%), en Slovaquie (19,0%), en Estonie (22,0%) et enBulgarie (24,0%).

Quant à l’impôt sur le revenu des sociétés, les taux maximums ajustés6 les plus élevés étaient enregistrés en 2008 à Malte (35,0%), enFrance (34,4%), en Belgique (34,0%) et en Italie (31,4%), et les plus faibles en Bulgarie et à Chypre (10,0% chacun), en Irlande(12,5%), en Lettonie et en Lituanie (15,0% chacun).

Ces dernières années, les taux maximums ont affiché une nette tendance à la baisse dans l’ensemble de l’UE, en particulier pour l’impôt des sociétés. En 2008, les plus fortes baisses des taux d’imposition maximums sur le revenu des sociétés ont été observées enAllemagne (-8,9 points de pourcentage), en Italie (-5,9 points) ainsi qu’en République tchèque et en Lituanie (-3,0 points chacun), En moyenne, les nouveaux États membres présentent des taux maximums nettement plus faibles.

Taux légal maximum de l’impôt sur le revenu des personnes en 2007, en %

 

RO
SK
EE
BG
LV
LT
CY
CZ
MT
UE27*
LU
HU
EL
FR
PL
16,0
19,0
22,0
24,0
25,0
27,0
30,0
32,0
35,0
38,7
39,0
40,0
40,0
40,0
40,0

 

 

UK
ZE15*
IE
SI
PT
IT
ES
DE
BE
AT
FI
NL
SE
DK
40,0
40,2
41,0
41,0
42,0
43,0
43,0
47,5
50,0
50,0
50,5
52,0
56,6
59,0

Sources: Services de la Commission européenne. * Moyenne arithmétique

Taux légal maximum ajusté* de l’impôt sur le revenu des sociétés en 2008, en %

 

BG
CY
IE
LV
LT
RO
PL
SK
EE
CZ
HU
SI
UE27**
EL
AT
10,0
10,0
12,5
15,0
15,0
16,0
19,0
19,0
21,0
21,0
21,3
22,0
23,6
25,0
25,0

 

 

DK
NL
FI
PT
ZE15**
SE
LU
DE
UK
ES
IT
BE
FR
MT
25,0
25,5
26,0
26,5
26,5
28,0
29,6
29,8
30,0
30,0
31,4
34,0
34,4
35,0

Sources: Services de la Commission européenne.

* Le taux légal maximum ajusté de l’impôt sur le revenu des sociétés prend en compte l’impôt des sociétés (IS) et, le cas échéant, les surtaxes, les taxes locales, voire les taxes supplémentaires prélevées sur des bases d’imposition semblables à l’IS, mais pas toujours identiques. Afin de tenir compte de ces composantes, le simple taux de l’IS a été ajusté à des fins de comparaison.

** Moyenne arithmétique.

  1. Le ratio des recettes fiscales sur le PIB mesure la charge fiscale globale comme étant le montant total des impôts et des cotisations sociales effectives obligatoires en pourcentage du PIB. Cet indicateur est largement utilisé pour mesurer la charge fiscale globale, mais il convient de noter qu’il inclut les impôts prélevés sur les transferts sociaux. Étant donné que les bénéficiaires des transferts sociaux reçoivent souvent directement une rémunération nette, ils ne sentent pas le poids de l’imposition. Cette définition diffère légèrement de celle utilisée dans le numéro de Statistiques en bref, Économie et finance, 47/2008, «Recettes fiscales dans l’UE», qui comprend les cotisations sociales volontaires et imputées. La différence entre les deux mesures s’élève à environ 1,5% du PIB pour les agrégats de l’UE et de la zone euro.
  2. UE27: Belgique (BE), Bulgarie (BG), République tchèque (CZ), Danemark (DK), Allemagne (DE), Estonie (EE), Irlande (IE), Grèce (EL), Espagne (ES), France (FR), Italie (IT), Chypre (CY), Lettonie (LV), Lituanie (LT), Luxembourg (LU), Hongrie (HU), Malte (MT), Pays-Bas (NL), Autriche (AT), Pologne (PL), Portugal (PT), Roumanie (RO), Slovénie (SI), Slovaquie (SK), Finlande (FI), Suède (SE) et Royaume-Uni (UK). Zone euro (ZE15): Belgique, Allemagne, Irlande, Grèce, Espagne, France, Italie, Chypre, Luxembourg, Malte, Pays-Bas, Autriche, Portugal, Slovénie et Finlande.
  3. «Taxation trends in the European Union: 1995-2006», EUR 40 (hors TVA), uniquement disponible en anglais. Cette publication est basée sur les données disponibles au 19 février 2008. Elle est disponible dans les points de vente autorisés ou peut être téléchargée gratuitement en format PDF sur le site d’Eurostat ou de la DG TAXUD: 
  1. Les taux d’imposition implicites (TII) mesurent la charge fiscale moyenne réelle sur les différents types de revenus ou d’activités économiques, c’est-à-dire sur le travail salarié, sur la consommation et sur le capital. Les TII expriment des revenus fiscaux cumulés, en pourcentage de la base d’imposition pour chaque domaine.

Le TII sur le travail est le ratio entre les impôts et les cotisations sociales perçues sur le revenu salarial et le coût du travail salarié. Le numérateur comprend toutes les taxes directes et indirectes, ainsi que les cotisations sociales versées par les salariés et par les employeurs et perçues sur les revenus du travail salarié, tandis que le dénominateur équivaut à la rémunération totale des salariés travaillant sur le territoire économique augmentée des impôts sur la masse salariale. Ce taux n’est calculé que pour le travail salarié (excluant ainsi la charge fiscale sur les transferts sociaux, notamment les retraites). La moyenne peut cacher d’importantes variations de la charge fiscale dans la répartition des revenus.

Le TII sur la consommation est le ratio entre les recettes des taxes à la consommation et la dépense de consommation finale des ménages sur le territoire économique.

Le TII sur le capital inclut, au niveau du numérateur, les impôts prélevés sur les revenus tirés de l’épargne et des investissements par les ménages et les sociétés ainsi que les prélèvements relatifs aux stocks de capital résultant de l’épargne et d’investissements effectués lors de périodes précédentes. Le dénominateur du TII du capital vise à donner une estimation du revenu du capital et du revenu professionnel des résidents des États membres dans le monde à des fins de fiscalité intérieure. Les tendances du TII sur le capital reflètent une grande diversité de facteurs et doivent être interprétées avec prudence.

Tous les TII pour l’UE et la zone euro sont calculés en tant que moyennes arithmétiques.

  1. Le taux légal maximum de l’impôt sur le revenu des personnes reflète le taux d’imposition pour la tranche de revenu la plus élevée. Pour le Danemark, la Finlande et la Suède, l’impôt communal sur le revenu est également inclus. Les données de l’Allemagne incluent la majoration de solidarité. Le taux de la Hongrie inclut l’impôt de solidarité.
  2. Le taux légal maximum ajusté de l’impôt des sociétés tient compte de l’impôt des sociétés (IS) et, le cas échéant, des surtaxes, des taxes locales, voire des taxes supplémentaires prélevées sur des bases d’imposition similaires à l’IS, mais pas toujours identiques. Afin de tenir compte de ces éléments, le simple taux de l’IS a été ajusté à des fins de comparaison.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »